Unemployment persistence in a small open labour market : the Irish case

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dc.contributor.author Walsh, Brendan M.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-14T15:25:13Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-14T15:25:13Z
dc.date.issued 1998-01
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10197/2980
dc.description.abstract This paper reviews previous research on Irish unemployment. It examines the reasons for the persistence of high unemployment and the relevance of the concept of a time-varying rate of "equilibrium" unemployment in a small and open labour market. The links between Irish and British unemployment, and the effects of economic growth on Irish unemployment, are explored. The difficulty of establishing links between Irish labour market conditions and wage price inflation is documented. The paper concludes with a discussion of contribution of centralised wage bargaining to the recent impressive performance of the Irish labour market. en
dc.description.sponsorship Not applicable en
dc.format.extent 2956437 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Dublin. School of Economics en
dc.relation.ispartofseries UCD Centre for Economic Research Working Paper Series en
dc.relation.ispartofseries WP98-01 en
dc.subject Unemployment en
dc.subject Irish economy en
dc.subject Open labour market en
dc.subject Equilibrium unemployment en
dc.subject.classification E24 en
dc.subject.classification J40 en
dc.subject.classification J64 en
dc.subject.lcsh Unemployment--Research--Ireland en
dc.subject.lcsh Labor market--Ireland en
dc.title Unemployment persistence in a small open labour market : the Irish case en
dc.type Working Paper en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.neeo.contributor Walsh|Brendan M.|aut|


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