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dc.contributor.author O'Riordan, William K.
dc.date.accessioned 2009-08-24T13:30:50Z
dc.date.available 2009-08-24T13:30:50Z
dc.date.issued 1989-01
dc.identifier.other 19891PP en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10197/1376
dc.description.abstract The data on employment and pay in the public sector in the OECD countries which are contained in Vol. II of the OECD "National Accounts Statistics" are used to compare public sector employment in Ireland with that in the rest of the OECD and to infer its effects on the Irish economy. The period covered is 1970-85. It appears that neither the size nor the growth-rate of public sector emplyment in Ireland is abnormal by OECD standards even when the level of income is taken into account. It llso appears that countries where large numbers are employed in the public do not seem to suffer from higher unemployment, less employment in other sectors or slower growth rates than other countries. The relative pay rates in the public sector in Ireland appear to be unusually high by OECD standards. It would seem, therefore, that if the public sector is a burden in Ireland, it is so, not because it is too big, but because it is too well-paid. en
dc.description.externalNotes A hard copy is available in UCD Library at GEN 330.08 IR/UNI en
dc.format.extent 554403 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Dublin. School of Economics en
dc.relation.ispartofseries UCD Centre for Economic Research Policy Paper Series en
dc.relation.ispartofseries PP89/1 en
dc.subject.lcsh Civil service--Ireland en
dc.subject.lcsh Ireland--Officials and employees en
dc.subject.lcsh Ireland--Economic conditions--20th century en
dc.title Is the Irish public sector a burden? en
dc.type Working Paper en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.type.capturetechnique PDFimage
dc.neeo.contributor O'Riordan|William K.|aut| en


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